Posted in Productivity

The Pomodoro technique

I’m writing this post because today marks the start of a writing bootcamp. I will be turning in 2,500 words a week for the next four weeks, and others on the bootcamp will be turning in between 1,000 and 10,000 words. No one is going to read them, but we’re holding each other accountable for getting words on paper.

2,500 words doesn’t sound like very much. But shall I tell you how many words I’ve written this week?

0

I’m not sure what it is I’ve been doing, but apparently it’s anything other than writing.

So I thought to kick things off, (do these words count towards the 2,500? You bet your ass they do) I’d write about writing.

Yes, I am procrastinating.

But bear with me. This is a useful technique and the only thing that has kept me on the straight and narrow when I have been on the straight and narrow.

The Pomodoro technique

pomodor

The Pomodoro Technique is a time management technique developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s.

The idea is that you work in 25 minute chunks, with short breaks in between. The word ‘pomodoro’ means tomato in Italian. The technique is named after the tomato shaped timer Francesco used as a student.

I bought one of these in January and I use it every time I write. Somehow the quiet ticking keeps me on task. Deep work is tricky to get into but when you’ve a metronome ticking away in the background it keeps the mind focussed.

Tick. Tick. Tick.

So to do the Pomodoro technique, you set your tomato timer for 25 minutes (and you don’t need a tomato shaped timer for this!) and you work solidly, with no interruptions, on the task at hand. Put your mobile on airplane mode, lock the kids in the shed.

No. Distractions.

Then when the timer buzzes, you take 5 minutes off. Do something completely different. You keep a record of your pomodoros and breaks on a sheet of paper. Do four at a time and then take a longer break of 20-30 minutes.

After a while you start to get a feel for how many pomodoros each writing task will take.

If you have top productivity tips, for writing or anything else (cleaning productivity tips extremely welcome), please drop me a note in the comments.

Wish us luck! I’ll report back once the bootcamp is finished on June 11th.

 

Posted in Productivity

Put that frog in the way

The Brian Tracy book, Eat That Frog, tells us to do the important, biggest, baddest and most unpleasant task of the day first.

Fine, but it really doesn’t appeal at all. The frog is lumpy, warty, unpleasant, still alive, and most importantly there are loads of other things to do which look more fun.

But there are some things that will make it less difficult to eat. I’m going to dispense with the frog analogy now because it’s getting annoying.

The point is, if there’s a horrible task to do, put it in the way. Make it something you have to get around, over or through to get to the fun stuff. Don’t let it hide.

Last week I had to book my daughter into the doctor for some vaccinations. This was boring, and I didn’t want to do it. OK, to be brutally honest, six months ago I had to book my daughter into the doctor for some vaccinations.

Last week, I remembered I still hadn’t done it. Irritating job. Really easy to do. Would have taken me 2 minutes, but I just wasn’t doing it.

In the end, the solution was to get her red book (where her vaccination records are kept) out of the bookshelf, and leave it on my desk. I wouldn’t let myself put it away until I’d booked her in.

It kicked around on my desk for days. In the way. Really annoying me. But I wouldn’t move it until I’d made the phone call. A little later in the week it annoyed me so much I wrote the doctor’s phone number on a post it note and stuck that to the book, so it was even easier to do the job. Still didn’t do it for 48 hours though. 48 hours in which I did all sorts of other stupid unproductive things, like play with my phone, which wasn’t getting me anywhere.

Eventually, this attritional (if that’s a word) technique worked. I did it, it took 2 minutes. So put that frog in your way.