ideas

Coming up with creative ideas

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Photo by Amélie Mourichon on Unsplash

A successful creative meeting:

Ideas flow freely. Coffee, biscuits and emergent laughter.

Everyone is contributing.

How familiar does this feel?

Creative meetings can be great for the confident and extroverted.

But I’ve definitely been in ‘creative’ meetings where I’ve been the least experienced in the room.

There is ‘banter’ – people are laughing at one another, putting down ideas they don’t like, vying for status.

What do we want out of a creative meeting? LOTS of ideas.

‘Lots’ means good ideas + bad + terrible ideas.

And if this is the ‘creative’ atmosphere, what you get are the ideas of the socially high status people, and nothing from anyone else.

So how can we run successful creative meetings?

The rules must be clear: we want all the ideas. That old cliche, ‘There are no bad ideas,’ is obviously wrong, but that needs to be the vibe at the meeting.

It’s important to encourage everyone to contribute in order to capture everything and keep the ideas coming until we have exhausted every avenue.

Under no circumstances must any idea be assessed, judged or analysed at the ideas stage.

If in doubt, use the rules of improv with your team: affirm and build. Add to other people’s ideas, rather than judging them.

The four animals in the room

There are, according to One Minute Millionaire, four types of animal that you can have in your team. Not only is this much more adorable than Myers-Briggs personality profiling, it is easier to understand, doesn’t require an online quiz, and can be summed up with an easy acronym, HOTS:

The hare – has lots of ideas, likes to hop from one to another and is more interested in generation than execution.

The owl – is wise and measured. Best placed with the hare to catch ideas. Good at seeing the bigger picture and working out how to take ideas forward. Team leaders are often owls.

The turtle – troubleshoots hare-brained schemes. Turtles like to turn ideas into plans, so that they can work out the problems and suggest solutions.

The squirrel – loves getting things done, happier with a list of tasks than in a creative session.

Work out which animals you have in your team. Encourage everyone to understand their spirit animal, and to embody it during the creative process.

Let the owls and the hares generate ideas. Encourage turtles to resist the urge to problem spot at this stage, or ask them along once generation is complete.

Some of your team might be less happy speaking up. Some people come up with ideas hours after the meeting. Allow ideas to come in late and/or submitted in private.

Give it a bit of time.

Once the ideas have been generated, it’s time to work out which ones to proceed with.

This is where the turtles come into their own. In a separate session, the owl invites the turtles to interrogate ideas. We send the hares for lunch at this point so that they don’t get upset.

The ideas the turtles like can now be given to the squirrels to execute.

If there’s just you in your team, you have hare, owl, turtle and squirrel within you.  You can use this model to plan your day.

If you’re generating creative ideas on your own, separate idea generation and analysis to ensure that you’re not talking yourself out of half the ideas at the generation stage.

This must be why writers like the Ernest Hemingway quote, “Write drunk, edit sober,” (despite there being no evidence he actually said it.)

How do you run your creative meetings?

 

How to start a creative meeting

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Photo by Davis Sanchez on Pexels.com

Regular creative meetings can be a bit of a challenge.

Who says I can pull an idea out of my ass at 2pm on a Tuesday, just because we agreed to talk then?

I may have just had a stressful morning trying to link up a wireless printer.

Or be in the middle of a complex situation with a friend/SO.

Or have been trying to engage my kids in homeschool for the last three hours.

We ask each other, ‘How are you?’ at the beginning of meetings and respond politely rather than give an answer which indicates how fit we are to do creative work at this moment.

Here’s an idea from Nathan and Barrett at The Future Belongs to Creators.

Start your meeting with a simple traffic light guide.

Each person reports whether they are ‘red’, ‘yellow’ or ‘green.’ Find colours which represent a mix if three options are not enough.

‘Green’ is in a good, open and creative mood. We’re not stressed, the creative juices are flowing, good things are going to happen today.

‘Yellow’ is somewhat stressed, perhaps there’s a lot going on at work or personally, we might be a little distracted.

And ‘Red’, presumably is the day when it might be best to sack the whole thing off until tomorrow. Not in a creative mood, distracted, stressed beyond the point where anything useful is going to get done.

Now you know how everyone’s feeling, adjust the approach of your meeting accordingly. Today might not be the best day to push hard for a huge brainstorming session. Or to deliver some difficult feedback to a colleague.

Are you red, yellow or green today?

 

Coming Up with ‘New’ Ideas

First of all, forget new ideas. There aren’t any. See through toaster? Already exists. Dusting drones? Done. DIY bath milk? What are you even talking about Harriet, that’s not a thing. Oh alright then, it is.

Whatever you come up with, it won’t be new. New is just old + old smooshed into a ball. All the way back to, “I wonder what happens if I bang these rocks together?”

Think about it. See through toaster = toaster + window. Dusting drones = drone + your Nan. You can work out the bath milk one.

Point is, you’ve got nothing. I’ve got nothing. Nobody’s got anything – every thought has been thought before. The good news is, it doesn’t matter. Smashing old ideas together is a valid way to become Elon Musk/Cardi B/any other entrepreneur you can think of.

How is it done though?

Years ago, this dude J.W.Young wrote a thing about how to come up with fresh stuff. He was in advertising, so we can assume he had to produce every day. He didn’t believe in ‘new’ either.

Here’s his method:

  1. Collect ‘materials’. Both general materials and those specific to what you’re making.
  2. Digest the stuff. Here we have to be like a ‘curious octopus.’ Pick each thing up, feel it all over like a randy, sorry, curious octopus. Feel for the meaning of it. Bring two things together, see how they fit. You’re looking for relationships and ‘synergies’.
  3. This is my favourite part. ‘Make absolutely no effort of a direct nature.’ I read this as: take the afternoon off and go to the pub.
  4. The ‘A-ha’ moment. Yes! This is what we’ve been waiting for. The ‘new’ idea hits us as we soak in a tub full of bath milk. There’s nowhere to write it down so we squirt it as best we can on the wall in Original Source Shower Gel.
  5. Idea meets reality. “The cold, grey dawn of the morning after.” We’ve all been there. See if the thing has legs. Tell people whose thoughts you value for feedback.

The good idea, according to Young, has ‘self-expanding qualities.’ If a friend thinks of things to add, you may be onto something. If they say nothing but nod politely as their eyes glaze gently over, you might want to drop it.

Coming back to his method years later, Young added that pursuing ‘general materials’ for the idea producer’s reservoir is best done as an end in itself, rather than whilst boning up for something.

With thanks to Maria Popova at Brain Pickings for an article about Young and a bunch of other stuff on creativity, productivity and how to be a human in the world.